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Geoffrey Miller

Associate Professor

Photo: Geoffrey Miller
Email: 
gfmiller@unm.edu
Phone: 
(505) 277-1967
Office: 
Logan Hall Rm 160, UNM Main Campus, Office Hours Thursday, 11 am - noon
Education: 
Ph.D., Stanford University, 1993
Curriculum vitae
 

Research Area/s:

Evolution and Development

Research Interests:

  • Evolutionary psychology, human nature, sexual selection, mutual mate choice, ovulatory cycle effects, mental fitness indicators (creativity, humor, art, music, moral virtues)
  • Behavior genetics, psychometrics, individual differences, intelligence, personality traits, mental disorders
  • Applied evolutionary psychology: Consumer behavior, market research, social media, smartphones, consulting, policy, popular science outreach

Full Publication List

Miller, G. F., Todd, P. M., & Hegde, S. U. (1989).  Designing neural networks using genetic algorithms. In J. D. Schaffer (Ed.), Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Genetic Algorithms (pp. 379-384). San Mateo, CA: Morgan Kaufmann. 

Miller, G. F., & Todd, P. M. (1990).  Exploring adaptive agency I: Theory and methods for simulating the evolution of learning.  In D. S. Touretsky, J. L. Elman, T. J. Sejnowski, & G. E. Hinton (Eds.), Proceedings of the 1990 Connectionist Models Summer School (pp. 65-80). San Mateo, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.

Todd, P. M., & Miller, G. F. (1991).  Exploring adaptive agency II: Simulating the evolution of associative learning.  In J.-A. Meyer & S. W. Wilson (Eds.), From Animals to Animats: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (pp. 306-315). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press/Bradford Books. 

Todd, P. M., & Miller, G. F. (1991). Exploring adaptive agency III: Simulating the evolution of habituation and sensitization. In H.-P. Schwefel & R. Manner (Eds.), Parallel problem solving from nature (pp. 307-313). Berlin: Springer-Verlag. 

Todd, P. M., & Miller, G. F. (1991). On the sympatric origin of species: Mercurial mating in the Quicksilver Model. In R. K. Belew & L. B. Booker (Eds.), Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Genetic Algorithms (pp. 547-554). San Mateo, CA: Morgan Kaufmann. 

Miller, G. F., & Todd, P. M. (1991). Let evolution take care of its own (Commentary on Clark, ‘Modeling behavioral adaptations.). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 14(1): 101-102. 

Miller, G. F. (1991). Two dynamic criteria  for validating claims of optimality (Commentary on Schoemaker, ‘The quest for optimality.) Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 14(2): 228-229. 

Freyd, J. J., & Miller, G. F. (1992).  Creature motion.  Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 30(6), 470. 

Miller, G. F., & Shepard, R. N. (1993). An objective criterion for apparent motion based on phase discrimination. Journal of Experimental Psychology:  Human Perception and Performance, 19(1), 48-62. +Todd, P. M., & Miller, G. F. (1993). Parental guidance suggested: How parental imprinting evolves through sexual selection as an adaptive learning mechanism.  Adaptive Behavior, 2(1), 5-47. 

Miller, G. F. (1993). Evolution of the human brain through runaway sexual selection: The mind as a protean courtship device. Ph.D. dissertation, Psychology Department, Stanford University. 

Miller, G. F. (1993). Dynamic mental representations of animate motion: The interplay among evolutionary, cognitive, and behavioural dynamics. School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, University of Sussex, Technical Report. 

Miller, G. F., & Todd, P. M. (1993). Evolutionary wanderlust: Sexual selection with directional mate preferences. In J.-A. Meyer, H. L. Roitblat, & S. W. Wilson (Eds.), From Animals to Animats 2: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (pp. 21-30).  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press/Bradford Books. 

Cliff, D., & Miller, G. F. (1994).  Co-evolution of pursuit and evasion I: Biological and game-theoretic foundations. School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, University of Sussex, Technical Report. 

Miller, G. F., & Cliff, D. (1994). Protean behavior in dynamic games: Arguments for the co-evolution of pursuit-evasion tactics in simulated robots. In D. Cliff, P. Husbands, J. A. Meyer, & S. Wilson (Eds.), From Animals to Animats 3: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (pp. 411-420). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press/Bradford Books. 

Miller, G. F. (1994). Exploiting mate choice in evolutionary computation: Sexual selection as a process of search, optimization, and diversification. In T. C. Fogarty (Ed.),  Evolutionary Computing: Proceedings of the 1994 Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behavior (AISB) Society Workshop (pp. 65-79). Berlin: Springer-Verlag. 

Husbands. P., Harvey, I., Cliff, D., & Miller, G. F. (1994). The use of genetic algorithms for the development of sensorimotor control systems. In P. Gaussier & J. D. Nicoud (Eds.),  Proceedings of the International Workshop from Perception to Action (pp. 100-121). Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society Press. 

Miller, G. F. (1994). Beyond shared fate: Group-selected mechanisms for cooperation and competition in fuzzy, fluid vehicles (Commentary on Wilson & Sober, ‘Reintroducing group selection to the behavioral sciences.’). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 17(4), 630-631.

Miller, G. F. (1994). Review of From Animals to Animats 2 edited by Meyer, Roitblat, & Wilson, Biosystems, 33, 149-152. +Miller, G.F., & Todd, P.M. (1994). Review of The adapted mind edited by Barkow, Cosmides, and Tooby,  Adaptive Behavior, 3(1), 83-95. 

Miller, G. F. (1995). Artificial life as theoretical biology: How to do real science with computer simulation. School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, University of Sussex, Technical Report. 

Cliff, D., & Miller, G. F. (1995). Tracking the Red Queen: Methods for measuring co-evolutionary progress in open-ended simulations. In F. Moran, A. Moreno, J. J. Merelo, & P. Cachon (Eds.), Advances in artificial life: Proceedings of the Third European Conference on Artificial Life (pp. 200-218).  Berlin: Springer-Verlag. 

Miller, G. F., & Todd, P. M. (1995). The role of mate choice in biocomputation: Sexual selection as a process of search, optimization, and diversification. In W. Banzhaf & F. H. Eeckman (Eds.), Evolution and biocomputation: Computational models of evolution (pp. 169-204). Berlin: Springer-Verlag. 

Blythe, P., Miller, G. F., & Todd, P. M. (1996).  Human simulation of adaptive behavior: Interactive studies of pursuit, evasion, courtship, fighting, and play.  In P. Maes, M. J. Mataric, J.-A. Meyer, J. Pollack, & S. W. Wilson (Eds.), From Animals to Animats 4: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (pp. 13-22). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 

Cliff, D., & Miller, G. F. (1996).  Co-evolution of pursuit and evasion II: Simulation methods and results. In P. Maes, M. J. Mataric, J.-A. Meyer, J. Pollack, & S. W. Wilson (Eds.), From Animals to Animats 4: Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Simulation of Adaptive Behavior (pp. 506-515).  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Miller, G. F. (1996). Political peacocks. Demos Quarterly. 

Todd, P. M., & Miller. G. F. (1997).  How cognition shapes cognitive evolution. IEEE Expert: Intelligent Systems and their applications, 12(4), 7-9. 

Husbands, P., Harvey, I., Cliff, D., & Miller, G. F. (1997).  Artificial evolution: A new path for artificial intelligence?  Brain and Cognition, 34(1),130-159.

Miller, G. F. (1997). Protean primates:  The evolution of adaptive unpredictability in competition and courtship. In A. Whiten & R. W. Byrne (Eds.),  Machiavellian intelligence II: Extensions and evaluations (pp. 312-340).  Cambridge, UK: Cambridge U. Press. 

Miller, G. F. (1997).  Mate choice: From sexual cues to cognitive adaptations. In G. Cardew (Ed.), Characterizing human psychological adaptations (Ciba Foundation Symposium 208) (pp. 71-87).  New York: John Wiley. 

Todd, P. M., and Miller, G. F. (1997).  Biodiversity through sexual selection.  In C. G. Langton and K. Shimohara (Eds.), Artificial Life V: Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (pp. 289-299). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press/Bradford Books. 

Miller, G. F. (1997).  Review of Evolution of the social contract by Brian Skyrms.  Times Literary Supplement, Aug. 29.

Miller, G. F., & Todd, P. M. (1998).  Mate choice turns cognitive. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2(5), 190-198.

Miller, G. F. (1998).  How mate choice shaped human nature: A review of sexual selection and human evolution.  In C. Crawford & D. Krebs (Eds.), Handbook of evolutionary psychology: Ideas, issues, and applications (pp. 87-129).  Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. 

Miller, G. F. (1998).  Review of The handicap principle by Amotz Zahavi. Evolution and Human Behavior, 19(5), 343-347. 

Miller, G. F. (1999).  Sexual selection for cultural displays.  In R. Dunbar, C. Knight, & C. Power (Eds.), The evolution of culture (pp. 71-91).  Edinburgh, Scotland: Edinburgh U. Press. 

Blythe, P. W., Todd, P. M., & Miller, G. F. (1999). How motion reveals intention: Categorizing social interactions. In  G. Gigerenzer & P. Todd. (Eds.), Simple heuristics that make us smart (pp. 257-285).   Oxford, UK: Oxford U. Press. 

Todd, P.M., & Miller, G. F. (1999). From Pride and Prejudice to Persuasion: Satisficing in mate search.  In G. Gigerenzer & P. Todd. (Eds.), Simple heuristics that make us smart (pp. 286-308).  Oxford, UK: Oxford U. Press. 

Miller, G. F. (1999). Waste: A sexual critique of consumerism.  Prospect magazine. 

Miller, G. F. (2000). Evolution of human music through sexual selection.  In N. L. Wallin, B. Merker, & S. Brown (Eds.), The origins of music (pp. 329-360).  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 

Miller, G. F. (2000).  Marketing.  In J. Brockman (Ed.), The greatest inventions of the last 2,000 years (pp. 121-126).  New York: Simon & Schuster.

Miller, G. F. (2000).  Technological evolution as self-fulfilling prophecy. In J. Ziman (Ed.), Technological innovation as an evolutionary process (pp. 203-215).  Cambridge, UK: Cambridge U. Press. 

Miller, G. F. (2000).  Mental traits as fitness indicators: Expanding evolutionary psychology’s adaptationism.  In D. LeCroy & P. Moller (Eds.), Evolutionary perspectives on human reproductive behavior (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Volume 907) (pp. 62-74).  New York: New York Academy of Sciences. 

Miller, G. F. (2000).  Sexual selection for indicators of intelligence.  In G. Bock, J. Goode, & K. Webb (Eds.), The nature of intelligence (Novartis Foundation Symposium 233) (pp. 260-275).  New York: John Wiley. 

Miller, G. F. (2000).  How to keep our meta-theories adaptive: Beyond Cosmides, Tooby, and Lakatos (Commentary on Ketelaar & Ellis, ‘Are evolutionary explanations unfalsifiable?’).  Psychological Inquiry, 11, 42-46.

Miller, G. F. (2000).  Alas, poor scholarship (Review of Alas, poor Darwin: Arguments against evolutionary psychology edited by Hilary Rose & Steven Rose).  London Evening Standard, July 3.

Miller, G. F. (2000).  Memetic evolution and human culture.  (Lead review of The meme machine by Susan Blackmore).  Quarterly Review of Biology, 75(4), 434-436. 

Miller, G. F. (2001).  Precis of ‘The mating mind’.  Psycoloquy, 12(008).  http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/cgi/psyc/newpsy?12.008 

Miller, G. F. (2001).  Aesthetic fitness: How sexual selection shaped artistic virtuosity as a fitness indicator and aesthetic preferences as mate choice criteria.  Bulletin of Psychology and the Arts, 2(1), 20-25. 

Miller, G. F. (2001).  The dark continent of sexual strategies.  (Review of The myth of monogamy by David Barash and Judith Eve Lipton).  Cerebrum, 3(3), 113-120.

Miller, G. F. (2002).  How did language evolve?  In H. Swain (Ed.), Big questions in science (pp. 79-90).  London: Jonathan Cape. 

Miller, G. F. (2002).  The science of subtlety.  In J. Brockman (Ed.), The next fifty years (pp. 85-92).  New York: Vintage.  

Miller, G. F. (2003). Fear of fitness indicators: How to deal with our ideological anxieties about the role of sexual selection in the origins of human culture.  In Being human: Proceedings of a conference sponsored by the Royal Society of New Zealand (Miscellaneous series 63) (pp. 65-79).  Wellington, NZ: Royal Society of New Zealand. 

Shaner, A., Miller, G. F., & Mintz, J. (2004).  Schizophrenia as one extreme of a sexually selected fitness indicator.  Schizophrenia Research, 70(1), 101-109. 

Miller, G. F. (2004).  Review of Descartes’ baby by Paul Bloom.  Seed magazine, September.

Prokosch, M., Yeo, R., & Miller, G. F. (2005).  Intelligence tests with higher g-loadings show higher correlations with body symmetry: Evidence for a general fitness factor mediated by developmental stability.  Intelligence, 33(2), 203-213.

Barrett, H. C., Todd, P. M., Miller, G. F., & Blythe, P. (2005).  Accurate judgments of intention from motion cues alone: A cross-cultural study. Evolution and Human Behavior, 26(4), 313-331.

Haselton, M., & Miller, G. F. (2006).  Women’s fertility across the cycle increases the short-term attractiveness of creative intelligence.  Human Nature, 17(1), 50-73.  

Cliff, D., & Miller, G. F. (2006).  Visualizing coevolution with CIAO plots. Artificial Life, 12(2), 199-202.  

Miller, G. F. (2006).  The Asian future of evolutionary psychology.  Evolutionary Psychology, 4, 107-119. 

Miller, G. F. (2006).  Asian creativity: A response to Satoshi Kanazawa.  Evolutionary Psychology, 4, 129-137. 

Keller, M., & Miller, G. F. (2006).  Which evolutionary genetic models best explain the persistence of common, harmful, heritable mental disorders?  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 29, 385-404.

Sefcek, J. A., Brumbach, B. H., Vásquez, G., & Miller, G. F. (2006). The evolutionary psychology of human mate choice: How ecology, genes, fertility, and fashion influence our mating behavior. Journal of Psychology and Human Sexuality, 18(2/3), 125-182. (known since 2007 as International Journal of Sexual Health)

Miller, G. F. (2006).  Debating sexual selection and mating strategies (Commentary on Roughgarden, Oishi, & Akcay, Reproductive social behaviour: Cooperative games to replace sexual selection.)  Science, 312(5774), 693. 

Miller, G. F., & Penke, L. (2007). The evolution of human intelligence and the coefficient of additive genetic variance in human brain size.  Intelligence, 35(2), 97-114. 

Miller, G. F. (2007).  Sexual selection for moral virtues. Quarterly Review of Biology, 82(2), 97-125. 

Miller, G. F. (2007).  Reconciling evolutionary psychology and ecological psychology: How to perceive fitness affordances.  Acta Psychologica Sinica, 39(3), 546-555. [Special issue on evolutionary psychology]. 

Miller, G. F., & Tal, I. (2007).  Schizotypy versus intelligence and openness as predictors of creativity.  Schizophrenia Research, 93(1-3), 317-324. 

Shaner, A., Miller, G. F., & Mintz, J. (2007).  Evidence of a latitudinal gradient in the age of onset of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 94(1-3), 58-63. 

Griskevicius, V., Tybur, J. M., Sundie, J. M., Cialdini, R. B., Miller, G. F., & Kenrick, D. T. (2007).  Blatant benevolence and conspicuous consumption: When romantic motives elicit costly displays. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93(1), 85-102. 

Penke, L., Denissen, J. J., & Miller, G. F. (2007).  The evolutionary genetics of personality.  European Journal of Personality, 21(5), 549-587. [target article] 

Andrews, P. W., Aggen, S. H., Miller, G. F., Radi, C., Dencoff, J. E., & Neale, M. C. (2007).  The functional design of depression’s influence on attention: A preliminary test of alternative control-process mechanisms.  Evolutionary Psychology, 5(3), 584-604. 

Miller, G. F., Tybur, J., & Jordan, B. (2007). Ovulatory cycle effects on tip earnings by lap-dancers: Economic evidence for human estrus? Evolution and Human Behavior, 28, 375-381. 

Tybur, J. M., Miller, G. F., & Gangestad, S. W. (2007).  Testing the controversy: An empirical examination of adaptationists’ attitudes towards politics and science.  Human Nature, 18(4), 313-328. 

Miller, G. F. (2007).  Brain evolution. In S. W. Gangestad & J. A. Simpson (Eds.), The evolution of human mind: Fundamental questions and controversies (pp. 287-293).  New York: Guilford Press.Miller, G. F. (2007).  Runaway consumerism explains the Fermi paradox.  In J. Brockman (Ed.), What is your dangerous idea? (pp. 240-243).  New York: Harper Perennial. Geher,

G., Miller, G. F., & Murphy, J. (2007).  Mating intelligence: Towards an evolutionarily informed construct.   In G. Geher & G. Miller (Eds.), Mating intelligence: Sex, relationships, and the mind’s reproductive system, pp. 3-34. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Kaufman, S. B., Kozbelt, A., Bromley, M. L., & Miller, G. F. (2007).  The role of creativity and humor in mate selection.  In G. Geher & G. Miller (Eds.), Mating intelligence: Sex, relationships, and the mind’s reproductive system (pp. 227-262). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Miller, G. F. (2007).  Mating intelligence: Frequently asked questions.  In G. Geher & Miller, G. F. (Eds.), Mating intelligence: Sex, relationships, and the mind’s reproductive system (pp. 367-393). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. 

Shaner, A., Miller, G. F., & Mintz, J. (2007).  Mental disorders as catastrophic failures of mating intelligence.  In G. Geher & G. Miller (Eds.), Mating intelligence: Sex, relationships, and the mind’s reproductive system (Chapter 1, pp. 193-223).  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. 

Sefcek, J. A., Brumbach, B. H., Vásquez, G., & Miller, G. F. (2007). The evolutionary psychology of human mate choice: How ecology, genes, fertility, and fashion influence our mating behavior. In  M. Knauth (Ed.), Handbook of the evolution of human sexuality (pp. 125-182).  Binghampton, NY: Haworth Press. 

Miller, G. F. (2007).  Sexual selection.  In R. Baumeister & K. Vohs (Eds.), Encyclopedia of social psychology.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Miller, G. F. (2007).  A secular humanist death.  In J. Brockman (Ed.), What are you optimistic about?  Today’s leading thinkers on why things are good and getting better.  New York: Harper Perennial.

Hooper, P., & Miller, G. F. (2008).  Mutual mate choice can drive ornament evolution even under perfect monogamy.  Adaptive Behavior, 16(1), 53-70. 

Greengross, G., & Miller, G. F.  (2008). Dissing oneself versus dissing rivals: Effects of status, personality, and sex on the short-term and long-term attractiveness of self-deprecating and other-deprecating humor.  Evolutionary Psychology, 6(3), 393-408. 

Shaner, A., Miller, G. F., & Mintz, J. (2008).  Autism as the low-fitness extreme of a parentally selected fitness indicator.  Human Nature, 19, 389-413. 

Andrews, P. W., Gangestad, S. W., Miller, G. F., Haselton, M. G., Thornhill, R., & Neale, M. C.  (2008). Sex differences in detecting sexual infidelity: Results of a maximum likelihood method for analyzing the sensitivity of sex differences to underreporting.  Human Nature, 19, 347-373. 

Miller, G. F. (2008).  Kindness, fidelity, and other sexually-selected virtues.  In W. Sinnott-Armstrong (Ed.), Moral psychology (Vol. 1): The evolution of morality: Adaptations and innateness (pp. 209-243).  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 
Klimentidis, Y., Miller, G. F., & Shriver, M. D. (2009). The relationship between European genetic admixture and body composition among Hispanics and Native Americans. American Journal of Human Biology, 21(3), 377-382. 

Klimentidis, Y. C., Miller, G. F., & Shriver, M. D. (2009).  Genetic admixture, self-reported ethnicity, self-estimated admixture, and skin pigmentation among Hispanics and Native Americans.  American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 138(4), 375-383.  +Greengross, G., & Miller, G. F. (2009).  The Big Five personality traits of professional comedians compared to amateur comedians, comedy writers, and college students.  Personality and Individual Differences, 47, 79-83. 

Arden, R., Gottfredson, L., Miller, G. F., & Pierce. A. (2009). Intelligence and semen quality are positively correlated.  Intelligence.  37, 277-282.  

Pierce, A., Miller, G. F., Arden, R., & Gottfredson, L. (2009).  Why is intelligence correlated with semen quality?  Biochemical pathways common to sperm and neuron function, and their vulnerability to pleiotropic mutations.  Communicative and Integrative Biology, 2(5), 1-3. 

Arden, R., Gottfredson, L., & Miller, G. F. (2009).  Does a fitness factor contribute to the association between intelligence and health outcomes?  Evidence from medical abnormality counts among 3,654 US Veterans. Intelligence, 37, 581-591. 

Nagai, M., Suganuma, M., Nijhawan, R., Freyd, J. J., Miller, G., & Watanabe, K. (2010).  Conceptual influence on the flash-lag effect and representational momentum.  In R. Nijhawan & B. Khurana (Eds.), Space and time in perception and action (pp. 366-378). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge U. Press. 

Miller, G. F. (2010).  Are polygenic mutations and Holocene selective sweeps the only evolutionary-genetic processes left for explaining heritable variation in human psychological traits?  In D. M. Buss & P. H. Hawley (Ed.), The evolution of personality and individual differences.  NY: Oxford U. Press. 

Greengross, G., & Miller, G. F. (2011).  Humor ability reveals intelligence, predicts mating success, and is higher in males. Intelligence, 39, 188-192. +Zietsch, B. P., Miller, G. F., Bailey, J. M., & Martin, N. G. (2011). Female orgasm rates are largely independent of other traits: Implications for “female orgasmic disorder” and evolutionary theories of orgasm. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 8(8), 2305-2316. 

Greengross, G., Martin, R. A., & Miller, G. F. (2011).  Personality traits, intelligence, humor styles, and humor production ability of professional stand-up comedians compared to college students. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 6(1), 74-82. Miller, G. F. (2011).  Foreword.  In A. De Block & P. R. Adriaens (Eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, psychiatry, and evolutionary theory.  Oxford U. Press, pp. v-ix.

Miller, G. F. (2011). My background, research interests, and future plans. In X.T. Wang & Su, Y.-J. (Ed.), Thus spake evolutionary psychologists (进化心理学家如是说), pp. 320-328. Beijing: Peking University Press.Miller, G. F. (2011).  The personality/insanity continuum. In J. Brockman (Ed.), This will make you smarter: New scientific concepts to improve your thinking, pp. 232-234.  NY: Harper Perennial.

Miller, G. F. (2011). Optimal drug use and rational drug policy. (Commentary on Müller & Schumannm, ‘Drugs as instruments’). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 34, 318-319. Miller, G. F. (2011). Genes fit for a queen: How Kate won her mate. New Scientist.

Jung, K., Ruthruff, E., Tybur, J., Gaspelin, N., & Miller, G. (2012).  Perception of facial attractiveness requires some attentional capacity:  Implications for the “automaticity” of psychological adaptations. Evolution and Human Behavior, 33, 241-250. +Miller, G. F., Zhu, G., Wright, M. J., Hansell, N. K., & Martin, N. G. (2012).  The heritability and genetic correlates of mobile phone use: A twin study of consumer behaviour. Twin Research and Human Genetics, 15(1), 97-106. 

Greengross, G., Martin, R. A., & Miller, G. F. (2012). Childhood experiences of professional comedians: Peer and parent relationships and humor use. Humor, 25(4): 491-505. 

Miller, G. F. (2012). The smartphone psychology manifesto. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7(3), 221-237. 

Yeater, E. A., Miller, G. F., Rinehart, J. K., & Nason, E. (2012). Trauma and sex surveys meet minimal risk standards: Implications for Institutional Review Boards. Psychological Science, 23(7), 780-787.

Costa, R. M., Miller, G. F., & Brody, S. (2012). Women who prefer longer penises are more likely to have vaginal orgasms (but not clitoral orgasms): Implications for an evolutionary theory of vaginal orgasm. Journal of Sexual Medicine (advanced online publication), 1-10. 

Miller, G. F. (2012).  Sex, evolution, and marketing. EMBO Reports, 13(10), 880-884. (IF 7.82).+Kirov, G., & Miller, G. F. (2012).  Creativity and mental disorder. (Commentary on Kyaga et al., BJP 2011, 199: 373-379). British Journal of Psychiatry, 200, 347.

Miller, G. F. (in press). Twenty-seven thoughts about multiple selves, sustainable consumption, and human evolution (pp. 27-35). In H. Van Trijp (Ed.), Encouraging sustainable consumption.  Oxford, U.K.: Psychology Press.

Miller, G. F. (2013). Mutual mate choice models as the Red Pill in evolutionary psychology: Long delayed, much needed, ideologically challenging, and hard to swallow. (Commentary on Stewart-Williams & Thompson, ‘The ape that thought it was a peacock’).  Psychological Inquiry, 24, 207-210. (IF 4.73).

Courses Taught

  • Psych 105 FLC: Human Nature and Social Behavior
  • Psych 231: Psychology of Human Sexuality
  • Psych 342: Evolution, Brain, and Behavior
  • Psych 450/650: Human Emotions
  • Psych 450/650: Intelligence and Creativity
  • Psych 499: Undergrad Research Experience

Lab

Ph.D. students:

Current: Ruth Sarafin
Former: Laura Dane, Ilanit Tal, Annie Caldwell, Joshua Tybur, Yann Klimentidis, Gil Greengross, Chris Jenkins

If you are interested in applying to my lab group as a Ph.D. student:

I am looking for bright, motivated, conscientious students with very strong GRE scores (above 700), a strong commitment to a research career in evolutionary psychology, good research experience, and solid academic training in psychology, biology, and/or anthropology. Interested students should contact me directly by email.

Note: I might accept one new Ph.D. student for fall 2016; if interested, email me and apply by Dec. 2015.  I will be away on sabbatical for all of 2016.